02 Features
Cereal Foods World, Vol. 65, No. 4
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Low- and High-Moisture Extrusion of Pulse Proteins as Plant-Based Meat Ingredients: A Review
Serap Vatansever,1 Mehmet C. Tulbek,2 and Mian N. Riaz3,4

1 Department of Plant Sciences, North Dakota State University, P.O. Box 6050, Fargo, ND 58108-6050, U.S.A.

2 AGT Foods R&D Centre, Saskatoon, SK S7T 0G3, Canada.

3 Department of Food Science and Technology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, U.S.A.

4 Corresponding author. Dr. Mian Nadeem Riaz, Department of Food Science and Technology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, U.S.A. E-mail: mnriaz@tamu.edu


© 2020 Cereals & Grains Association

Abstract

Plant-based meat alternatives have become a major staple in the North American marketplace due to changing consumer demands. The main drivers of this market segment are changing dietary patterns, increasing numbers of consumers pursuing vegetarian and flexitarian lifestyles, rising individual income in developing countries, and an increase in global awareness of environmental concerns. Pulse crops and pulse proteins present an outstanding nutritional value chain, along with superior techno-functionality that can meet the requirements of plant proteins for producing meat analogue ingredients. In addition, pulse crops can assist in reducing carbon footprint by fixing nitrogen during agricultural production rotations. Pulse proteins also offer alternative solutions for addressing gluten-free, low-allergen, and GMO-free meat alternatives in the global marketplace. Alternative pulse-based solutions with similar sensory and texture attributes may be used to substitute for meat ingredients in new product applications.





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